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Abstract

Food acceptance is a complex field influenced by many factors requiring both acceptance, perceptual and physical and chemical information if it is to be understood. In this chapter, some of the problems and approaches available for acquiring acceptance and perceptual information, with examples, are reviewed. Also the various procedures and underlying psychological/behavioural models that enable links to be developed between the two and consequently lead to a deeper understanding of how consumers select food are explored.

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© 1994 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

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Williams, A.A. (1994). Food acceptability. In: Piggott, J.R., Paterson, A. (eds) Understanding Natural Flavors. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-2143-3_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-2143-3_3

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Boston, MA

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4613-5895-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4615-2143-3

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