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Abstract

Unlike other chilled perishable foods that are modified atmosphere packed, fresh fruit and vegetables continue to respire after harvesting, and consequently any subsequent packaging must take into account this respiratory activity. Respiration is a very complex biochemical phenomenon whereby carbohydrates, polysaccharides, organic acids and other energy sources are metabolised into simpler molecules with the production of heat. The products of aerobic respiration are carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapour, whereas fermentation products such as ethanol, acetaldehyde and organic acids are produced during anaerobic respiration. Respiration is affected by numerous intrinsic properties of fresh produce as well as various extrinsic factors, but, generally speaking, the achievable shelf-life of modified atmosphere packed produce is inversely proportional to respiration rate (sections 6.2.2 and 6.3).

Keywords

Fresh Fruit Fresh Produce Modify Atmosphere Packaging Chilling Injury Clostridium Botulinum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. P. F. Day

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