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Anhydrous Milkfat Products and Applications in Recombination

  • D. Illingworth
  • T. G. Bissell

Summary

AMF in its various forms is defined and the main uses and world production figures are listed. Details are given of the manufacturing processes used for AMF, covering all possible feedstocks—direct from cream and different types of butter—together with a section describing the production of ghee and samna balady. The importance of cream pretreatment in the direct-from-cream process is stressed, and the phase inversion stage is then covered, with emphasis placed on the factors having the most influence on the efficiency of the process. The manufacturing process is described by reference to the equipment used at each stage of the process—cream concentration, phase inversion, separation and dehydration. Equipment manufactured by Westfalia and Alfa Laval is described in detail. Methods for monitoring the performance of the plant are confined to measurement of the fat content of various streams within the plant. The quality of the AMF produced depends mainly on free fatty acid levels, measurement of oxidative deterioration, such as peroxide value or anisidine value, and contamination by other oils and fats. Reference is made to the analytical methods which may be used to measure these directly, together with methods for determining trace metals such as copper and iron which catalyse oxidation. The effect of dissolved oxygen on the storage stability of AMF and methods for measurement of dissolved oxygen are discussed. A description of the various ways of packaging AMF for both industrial and retail use leads into sections covering the use of AMF and its fractions in recombined products. These include recombined butter and other spreads and blends, with descriptions of plant and equipment which can be used, ice cream, recombined milks and cream and cheese. The handling of AMF and the quality of other materials used in recombining is discussed.

Keywords

Peroxide Value Phase Inversion Plate Heat Exchanger Soft Fraction International Dairy Federation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Illingworth
    • 1
  • T. G. Bissell
  1. 1.New Zealand Dairy Research InstitutePalmerston NorthNew Zealand

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