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The by-products of fruit processing

  • R. Cohn
  • A. L. Cohn

Abstract

The production of by-products from the waste of the citrus processing industry has increased in recent decades for the following principal reasons:
  1. 1

    The increase in total quantity of fruit used for juice manufacture.

     
  2. 2

    The economic importance of the by-products to the juice producer because they increase profitability.

     
  3. 3

    The need to overcome the environmental problems caused by waste material accumulating in each plant.

     
The statistics of the Brazilian and USA citrus industry in 1991/2 serve as an excellent example. The total fruit supply to the citrus industry in 1991/2in Brazil was 8 107 000 tonnes of which about 4 000 000 tonnes was waste material, whilst in the USA, 7 155 000 tonnes of raw fruit was used and gave rise to about 3 300 000 tonnes waste material. There are large differences between the different fruit varieties in the amount of waste per tonne from processed fruit. In the apple industry, for example, waste is 10–15%, which compares with about 50% in the citrus industry and up to 70% with some tropical fruits. Nearly all the waste from the citrus industry can be successfully converted into animal food or fodder products.

Keywords

Orange Peel Peel Extract Pectic Substance Citrus Peel Fruit Processing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Cohn
  • A. L. Cohn

There are no affiliations available

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