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Treatment and Disposal of Processing Wastes

  • V. C. Nielsen

Abstract

The poultry industry is world-wide and embodies varying degrees of specialisation and intensification, ranging from the small, part-time poultry keeper to national and international companies controlling many millions of birds located on numerous sites. The industry is tending to develop towards large and specialised units; in England and Wales, for example, there were 1443 registered holdings containing 51 million broilers at any one time (Anon., 1986). However, 74% of these broilers were on 303 holdings. Similarly, the processing industry has developed from small, on-farm facilities, using dry handling methods and very labour intensive systems, to large, specialised factories dealing with many thousands of birds an hour. The larger poultry companies grow the birds and process and market their own products. The processing plants are normally quite separate from the farms, and are often located on industrial sites. Some of the small-scale processors operate from sites where there is access to land for the disposal of waste-waters.

Keywords

Chemical Oxygen Demand Activate Sludge Anaerobic Digestion Biochemical Oxygen Demand Processing Waste 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. C. Nielsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Agricultural Development and Advisory ServiceFarm Waste UnitSilsoe, BedfordUK

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