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The Status of the Premotor Areas: Evidence from PET Scanning

  • R. E. Passingham

Summary

There has been no agreement as to the role of the premotor areas including the supplementary motor cortex. Some believe them to play a role in the execution of movement; others believe them to play a role in the selection of movement. This paper suggests a resolution. Recent evidence from PET studies indicates that these areas should be divided into anterior and posterior sectors. Evidence is provided that the posterior sectors play a role in the execution of movement and that the anterior sectors play a role in the selection of movement.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. E. Passingham
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Experimental PsychologyUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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