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Isolated Muscle Spindles, their Motor Innervation and Central Control

  • M. H. Gladden

Summary

The facility to isolate muscle spindles continues to provide new insights into their physiology, but the rationale for the heterogeneous composition of γs-fusimotor units is still unknown. A fusimotor unit consists of a γs- or γd -motoneurone and all the intrafusal fibres that neurone innervates, though these fibres are distributed among several spindles, γd-motoneurones have one effector, the bag 1 fibre, but γs-motoneurones have two, bag2 and chain fibres. Boyd’s view was that there are two types of fusimotor unit whose principal component was either bag2 or chain fibres. The reasons why this attractively simple hypothesis cannot be accepted now unequivocably are explained.

Keywords

Muscle Spindle Indirect Test Sensory Ending Intrafusal Fibre Chain Fibre 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. H. Gladden
    • 1
  1. 1.Muscle Spindle Physiology Group, Institute of PhysiologyUniversity of GlasgowScotland, UK

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