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The Reduction of Propionic Anhydride by Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-NADH Mixtures at pH 7

  • Rosemary L. Motion
  • Jeremy P. Hill
  • Kimmo Wiltshire
  • Paul D. Buckley
  • Leonard F. Blackwell
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 372)

Abstract

Although the oxidation of aldehydes by aldehyde dehydrogenase is usually considered to be irreversible, Hart & Dickinson (1978) have shown that anhydrides of carboxylic acids could be reduced to aldehydes by enzyme.NADH mixtures. In a later study Motion et al (1988) demonstrated that acylation of aldehyde dehydrogenase.NADH complexes by acetic anhydride led to the production of acetaldehyde and NAD+ in stoichiometric amounts. It is clear from these results, and the fact that 80% of the initial NADH concentration can be oxidised by anhydrides at an almost constant rate, that there is no intrinsic thermodynamic barrier to the reverse reaction once the appropriate acyl enzyme species is formed. The mechanism for reduction of aldehydes is presumably the reverse of that for aldehyde oxidation (Scheme I).

Keywords

Reverse Reaction Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Acetic Anhydride Hydride Transfer Constant Of25 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Bennett, A.F., Buckley, P.D. and Blackwell, L.F., 1982, Proton release during the pre-steady-state oxidation of aldehydes by aldehyde dehydrogenase. Evidence for a rate limiting conformation change, Biochemistry, 21, 4404–4413.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosemary L. Motion
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jeremy P. Hill
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kimmo Wiltshire
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paul D. Buckley
    • 1
    • 2
  • Leonard F. Blackwell
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and BiochemistryMassey UniversityPalmerston NorthNew Zealand
  2. 2.Palmerston North, New ZealandDairy Research InstitutePalmerston NorthNew Zealand

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