Nutrition and Coronary Heart Disease Epidemiology

  • Herman A. Tyroler
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 369)

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies of the etiology of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD), and clinical and population based approaches to its prevention and control, have evolved with recognition of the importance of many risk factors. However, despite acceptance of the concept of multifactorial causality, and continuing identification of an increasingly larger number of contributing factors extending from the molecular genetic to the societal level, the role of nutrition and the diet-lipid-CHD theory have remained central to CHD epidemiology. For this presentation, I have assumed hat the theory, positing causal links between diet, serum cholesterol, atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, is valid without presenting and evaluating all the massive evidence related to this assumption. Rather, I shall illustrate the theory’s explanatory and predictive properties and its application in public health preventive and control programs as seen from a population oriented epidemiological perspective.

Keywords

Cholesterol Sugar Obesity Migration Toxicity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Herman A. Tyroler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public HealthUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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