Effect of Bacterial Antigens on Local Immunity

  • Ch. Ruedl
  • G. Wick
  • H. Wolf
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 371)

Abstract

The ability of intestinal lymphoid cells to migrate to, and localize in, other mucosal tissues, e. g. the respiratory and genitourinary tract, and other secretory glands, underlines the relevance of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) in the local immune response. Following antigen presentation, activated cells from the GALT pass from the lymphatics to the blood circulation via the ductus thoracicus, disseminate into distant mucosal tissues where the cells further proliferate and differentiate into memory and effector cells. In fact, it is known that enteric ingestion of microbial antigens induces S-IgA responses in remote external secretions.1,2

Keywords

Migration EDTA Integrin Staphylococcus Collagenase 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ch. Ruedl
    • 1
  • G. Wick
    • 1
  • H. Wolf
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for General and Experimental PathologyUniversity of Innsbruck, Medical SchoolInnsbruckAustria

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