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The Effect of Temperature on Chemical Synaptic Transmission to Spinal Motoneurones in the Frog

  • H. P. Clamann
  • A. E. Dityatev

Abstract

It has long been known that action potentials may fail to be conducted past branches in axons in the central (reviewed by Lüscher & Clamann, 1992) or peripheral nervous systems (Westerfield, Joyner & Moore, 1978). Conduction past branch points depends critically on their geometry and on the local conductance. The conductance is in turn influenced by ionic concentrations and by temperature. Experiments (Westerfield et al., 1978, Lüscher & Clamann, 1992) and simulations (see Lüscher & Clamann, 1992 for review) have shown that propagation past such branch points failed above a critical ratio of post-branch to pre-branch diameters. This ratio is very sensitive to temperature, so that conduction is more reliable at lower temperatures.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. P. Clamann
    • 1
  • A. E. Dityatev
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of BerneBerneSwitzerland

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