Mutations Associated with Viral Sequences Isolated from Mice Persistently Infected with MHV-JHM

  • J. O. Fleming
  • C. Adami
  • J. Pooley
  • J. Glomb
  • E. Stecker
  • F. Fazal
  • S. C. Baker
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 380)

Abstract

Mouse hepatitis virus JHM (JHMV or MHV-4) induces subacute and chronic demyelination in rodents and has been studied as a model of human demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. However, despite intensive investigation, the state of JHMV during chronic disease is poorly understood. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification (RT-PCR) to “rescue” viral RNA, we have found that JHMV-specific sequences persist for at least 787 days after intracerebral inoculation of experimental mice. Analysis of persisting viral RNA reveals that it is extensively mutated, and we hypothesize that the mutations observed reflect adaptation of the viral quasispecies to low-level intracellular replication during chronic disease.

Keywords

Hepatitis Codon Cage Microbe Encephalitis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. O. Fleming
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Adami
    • 3
  • J. Pooley
    • 1
  • J. Glomb
    • 3
  • E. Stecker
    • 1
  • F. Fazal
    • 3
  • S. C. Baker
    • 3
  1. 1.The Departments of Neurology and Medical Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of Wisconsin School of MedicineMadisonUSA
  2. 2.William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans HospitalMadisonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyLoyola University of Chicago Stritch School of MedicineMaywoodUSA

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