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Evaluation of In Vivo Free Radical Activity during Endotoxic Shock Using Scavengers, Electron Microscopy, Spin Traps, and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

  • Daniel J. Brackett
  • Megan R. Lerner
  • Michael F. Wilson
  • Paul B. McCay
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 366)

Abstract

Controversy exists concerning the involvement of free radical activity during sepsis and endotoxic shock as evidence has accumulated that both implicate and eliminate free radicals in the pathophysiologic events that occur during these disease processes. The majority of these data are from studies utilizing scavengers or inhibitors of lipid peroxidation to attenuate the activity resulting from excessive free radical generation and as such represent only indirect evidence of the presence of free radicals. This study employed methodology combining spin trapping techniques with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy1 to directly verify the presence of in vivo free radical generation in the conscious endotoxic rat.2 Additionally, myocardial structure has been evaluated using transmission electron microscopy to assess the effect of a hydroxyl radical scavenger on endotoxin-induced injury to the myocardium.3

Keywords

Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Free Radical Generation Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Hydroxyl Radical Scavenger Endotoxic Shock 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    P.B. McCay and J.L. Poyer, General mechanisms of spin trapping in vitro and in vivo, in: “Handbook of Free Radicals and Antioxidants in Biomedicine” p187, CRC Press, Boca Raton.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    D.J. Brackett, E.K. Lai, M.R. Lerner, M.F. Wilson, and P.B. McCay, Spin trapping of free radicals produced in vivo in heart and liver during endotoxemia, Free Rad Res Comms 7:315 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    D.L. Stiers, D.J. Brackett, and M.F. Wilson, Dimethyl sulfoxide protection of endotoxin-induced myocardial injury, in: “Proceedings of the 46th Annual Meeting of the Electron Microscopy Society of America” p 320, G.W. Bailey, ed., San Francisco Press, Inc., San Francisco (1988).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel J. Brackett
    • 1
  • Megan R. Lerner
    • 1
  • Michael F. Wilson
    • 3
  • Paul B. McCay
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Surgery and AnesthesiologyUniversity of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and the Veterans Affairs Medical CenterUSA
  2. 2.Oklahoma Medical Research FoundationOklahoma CityUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineState University of New York Millard Fillmore HospitalsBuffaloUSA

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