Ecology, Distribution, and Isolation of Thermus

  • Gudni A. Alfredsson
  • Jakob K. Kristjansson
Part of the Biotechnology Handbooks book series (BTHA, volume 9)

Abstract

Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors determining the physiological activities of organisms and their evolution. High temperatures can be tolerated to varying degrees by different organisms. Many complex multicellular organisms are unable to withstand a temperature of 50 °C, even for very short periods, whereas many microorganisms survive, and even thrive, in much higher temperatures for extended periods.

Keywords

Biomass Starch Chlorophyll Agar Siliceous 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gudni A. Alfredsson
    • 1
  • Jakob K. Kristjansson
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Biology, Microbiology LaboratoryUniversity of IcelandReykjavikIceland

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