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Abstract

Fatigue is one of the most important failure modes to be considered in mechanical and structural design. It has been stated that fatigue accounts for more than 80% of all observed service failures in mechanical and structural systems. Moreover, fatigue and fracture failures are often catastrophic; they may come without warning and may cause significant property damage, as well as loss of life. Many cases of critical component fractures are observed in applications in which failures previously had not been encountered.

Keywords

Fatigue Life Fatigue Strength Limit State Function Fatigue Data Stress Intensity Factor Range 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. H. Wirsching

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