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Theories and Experiments on Friction, Deformation, and Fracture in Plastic Deformation Processes

  • Shiro Kobayashi

Abstract

Various methods of analysis, based on different assumptions and degrees of approximation, have been developed for the solution of plastic deformation problems. The choice of a specific method depends upon the information sought. In this paper, the problems of friction, deformation characteristics, and fracturing involved in plastic deformation processes are discussed, using three different methods of analysis: the upper-bound, the slip-line, and the finite element methods.

Keywords

Plastic Zone Velocity Discontinuity Contact Pressure Distribution Plastic Deformation Process Localize Deformation Zone 
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shiro Kobayashi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering, Division of Mechanical DesignUniversity of California at BerkeleyUSA

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