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Growing Up in an Alcoholic Family

Structuring Pathways for Risk Aggregation and Theory-Driven Intervention
Chapter

Abstract

The University of Michigan-Michigan State University (UM-MSU) Longitudinal Study is a prospective study of children at high risk for the later development of alcoholism with high antisocial co-occurring psychopathology, as well as high risk for a wide variety of intraindividual, interpersonal, and sociocultural difficulties, including the development of other psychopathology, social complications, poor school achievement, poor physical health status, marital difficulties and divorce, lower levels of occupational achievement, and earlier death (Zucker, Fitzgerald, & Moses, 1995a).

Keywords

Antisocial Behavior Alcohol Problem Antisocial Personality Disorder Parental Psychopathology Parental Alcohol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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