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Learning and Intimacy in the Families of Anxious Children

Chapter

Abstract

Humans have an inherent capacity to react to threat stimuli with fear and anxiety. For the majority of children and adolescents, fears and anxieties are common, functional, and transitory. For this reason, both parents and other caregivers often correctly view childhood anxiety as a passing complaint. Unfortunately, epidemiological studies using self-report measures indicate that anxiety problems are the most common form of child and adolescent psychological problems. More tentative evidence indicates that these problems may, in their severest forms, be disabling and chronic and may have some continuity with adult anxiety problems (Keller, et al., 1992; Pfeiffer, Lipkins, Plutchik, & Mizruchi, 1988; cf. Last, Perrin, Hersen, & Kazdin, 1996).

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Attachment Style Behavioral Inhibition Anxious Child Express Emotion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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