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Exercise and Growth Hormone Secretion

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Growth Hormone And The Heart

Part of the book series: Endocrine Updates ((ENDO,volume 9))

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Abstract

Exercise favors enhanced cardiovascular conditioning, increased muscle strength and maintenance of bone mineral accretion. Many facets of these physiological adaptations are dependent in part on adequate trophic hormones, such as testosterone, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I) (1-6). In addition, acute exercise stimulates the release of GH as well as that of multiple other hormones and metabolites (711). Sustained physical training can elevate circulating concentrations of GH as well as IGF-I and GH-binding protein (12). Importantly, a number of clinical variables affect the magnitude and nature of the GH response to exercise (Table I). Neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying exercise-facilitated GH secretion are complex, and likely include somatostatin withdrawal, GHRH release and possibly co-secretagogue actions (1). Aging and obesity characteristically impair basal GH secretion and the GH response to an exercise stimulus (1,11,13-17). However, in the healthy young adult with normal body composition, vigorous exercise is a potent and effective GH secretagogue (9,18-20). Indeed, exercise is nearly unique in its ability to generate recurrent GH elevations serially throughout the same day (21), and to show escape from GH autonegative feedback (22). In healthy endurance-trained athletes, exercise of short duration (10 min) at intensities exceeding the lactate threshold typically evoke substantial GH release (23), whereas in less well-trained individuals an exercise-intensity dose-response relationship is evident even below the lactate threshold when a 30 min exercise bout is used (18,24). The present review highlights some of these regulatory aspects of the GH-IGF-I axis under acute or chronic exercise drive.

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Veldhuis, J.D., Weltman, A. (2001). Exercise and Growth Hormone Secretion. In: Giustina, A., Manelli, F. (eds) Growth Hormone And The Heart. Endocrine Updates, vol 9. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-1579-1_13

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