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Abstract

This paper describes the logical foundations of an implemented system which employs resolution-based theorem proving techniques for high-level robot control. The paper offers complementary logical characterizations of perception and planning, and shows how sensing, planning and acting are interleaved to control a real robot.

Keywords

Cognitive robotics reasoning about action 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Murray Shanahan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Electronic EngineeringImperial CollegeLondonEngland

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