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The Timing of Evaluation of Genebank Materials and the Effects of Biotechnology

  • Bonwoo Koo
  • Brian D. Wright
Chapter
Part of the Natural Resource Management and Policy book series (NRMP, volume 20)

Abstract

Plant genetic resources have provided basic building blocks for the improvement of plant varieties, and recent advances in biotechnology have opened up more possibilities for the use of these resources in crop improvement. Collections of germplasm (the “material that controls heredity,”Witt, 1985 : 8) for conservation purposes in ex situ genebanks have been greatly expanded over the past decades. However, materials in genebanks are not used extensively by plant breeders (Wright, 1997). One frequently cited obstacle to greater utilization is the lack of information useful to breeders regarding the samples of germplasm held as accessions in ex situ collections.

Keywords

Search Cost Plant Genetic Resource Development Cost Expected Cost Post Evaluation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bonwoo Koo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Brian D. Wright
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.International Food Policy Research InstituteUSA
  2. 2.University of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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