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Perceptual Barriers to Valuing and Supporting Youth

  • Susan Nall Bales
Part of the Outreach Scholarship book series (OUTR, volume 6)

Abstract

While significant time and research have been aimed at understanding the way Americans think about children’s issues, little of this work has directly addressed youth. The question of whether Americans think differently about young children than they do about teenagers has long plagued children’s advocates in such mundane ways as choosing between images of children for promotional materials or policy campaigns. While images of little kids might invite sympathy and protectiveness, it has been reasoned, pictures of teens may incite fear and harsh judgments. The simple answer of using categorical monikers—children, kids, and so on—obscures the different needs of adolescents, making it hard to introduce programs that relate to sexuality and work, for example, without their sounding like a non sequitur. Sooner or later, in order to understand the opinion climate that determines how youth issues will be greeted by the public, communications research on youth images had to be undertaken.

Keywords

Young People Youth Development Focus Group Participant News Story White Youth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Nall Bales

There are no affiliations available

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