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Biological and Molecular Characteristics of an HEV Isolate Associated with Recent Acute Outbreaks of Encephalomyelitis in Quebec Pig Farms

  • A. Marie-Josée Sasseville
  • Anne-Marie Gélinas
  • Nicole Sawyer
  • Martine Boutin
  • Serge Dea
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 494)

Abstract

Porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (HEV) is a member of the antigenic subgroup of hemagglutinating coronaviruses, including human respiratory coronavirus HCV-OC43, bovine and turkey coronaviruses, and mouse hepatitis virus (Spaan et al., 1988). These viruses share antigenic determinants located on their homologous structural proteins N, M, HE and S. The HEV specifically infects swine, having a strong tropism for epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract and for the central nervous system (CNS) (Andries and Pensaert, 1980). The virus causes two clinical syndromes: the vomiting and wasting disease (VWD) and non-suppurative encephalomyelitis (Pensaert and Andries, 1993). The mode of transmission is through nasal secretions and the virus spread via the peripheral nerves to the CNS. The HEV infection is believed to be widespread in many pig producing countries as a subclinical condition.

Keywords

Mouse Hepatitis Virus Bovine Coronavirus Homologous Structural Protein Porcine Hemagglutinating Encephalomyelitis Virus Acetyl Esterase Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Marie-Josée Sasseville
    • 1
  • Anne-Marie Gélinas
    • 1
  • Nicole Sawyer
    • 1
  • Martine Boutin
    • 1
  • Serge Dea
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre de Recherche en Microbiologie et BiotechnologieINRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Université du QuébecLavalCanada

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