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The Effect of Hypertension in Diabetes

  • Ellen D. Burgess
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 498)

Abstract

The Hypertension in Diabetes Study (HDS) reported the prevalence of hypertension in newly-diagnosed type2 diabetics was 39%, using the criteria of a blood pressure >160/90 or taking medication for hypertension1. If the criterion of 140/90 is used instead, the prevalence could be as high as 90%. In the HDS the newly-diagnosed diabetic patients had already had an increased event-rate compared to the normo-tensive diabetic patients, and a follow-up study demonstrated that hypertensive diabetic patients had about twice the rate of fatal and non-fatal diabetic outcomes2. Since diabetic persons have a risk of events about twice that of non-diabetic persons, then the hypertensive diabetic person has a risk about 4-times that of a normo-tensive non-diabetic individual.

Keywords

Diabetic Nephropathy Diabetic Retinopathy United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Afferent Arteriole Hypertensive Diabetic Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ellen D. Burgess
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of MedicineUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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