Selective Tumor Uptake of Boronophenylalanine-Fructose (BPA-F) in an Animal Model of Hepatic Colorectal Metastases

  • Cynthia Chuang
  • Paul Busse
  • Matthew Palmer
  • Peter Thomas
  • Robert Zamenhof

Abstract

In 1998 more than 150,000 Americans will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and over 60,000 will die from this tumor. At the time of diagnosis, 15–25% will have hepatic metastases, and another 20–30% will develop metastatic hepatic lesions subsequent to resection of the primary tumors. Treatment options for hepatic metastases include aggressive surgical resection, administration of regional chemotherapeutic agents, sys temic chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or other palliative and experimental procedures. Despite well-defined pharmacological benefits of selected chemotherapeutics, there is no convincing survival advantage for many of the above mentioned techniques.1,2,3,4 The median survival after diagnosis is typically 22–24 months, and has changed minimally over the past decade.

Keywords

Toxicity Lithium Boron Sulfuric Acid Fructose 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia Chuang
    • 1
  • Paul Busse
    • 2
  • Matthew Palmer
    • 3
  • Peter Thomas
    • 4
  • Robert Zamenhof
    • 3
  1. 1.Nuclear Reactor LaboratoryMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Joint Center for Radiation Therapy, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical CenterHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical CenterHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Cancer Biology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical CenterHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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