Paleocene-Eocene Microvertebrates in Freshwater Limestones of the Willwood Formation, Clarks Fork Basin, Wyoming

  • Jonathan I. Bloch
  • Gabriel J. Bowen
Part of the Topics in Geobiology book series (TGBI, volume 18)

Abstract

Terrestrial sediments from the Bighorn Basin and contiguous Clarks Fork Basin of northwestern Wyoming have yielded the best record of late Paleocene and early Eocene mammalian evolution known anywhere in the world (see Gingerich, 1980). Fossils preserved in sediments of the Fort Union and Willwood Formations, mostly avulsion belt and overbank deposits (Kraus and Asian, 1993; Kraus, 1997), document a radiation of archaic mammals and the existence of the modern orders Marsupialia, Carnivora, Dermoptera, and Lipotyphla in the Paleocene; the first appearance of rodents in North America in the latest Paleocene; and the earliest records of Artiodactyla, hyaenodontid Creodonta, Perissodactyla, and Primates in the earliest Eocene (Gingerich, 1989).

Keywords

Sandstone Lime Silt Jurassic Hunt 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan I. Bloch
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gabriel J. Bowen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Earth Sciences DepartmentUniversity of California, Santa CruzSanta CruzUSA
  2. 2.Department of Geological Sciences and Museum of PaleontologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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