Advertisement

Labor Markets and Economic Transformation in Postcommunist Europe

  • Robert M. Jenkins
Part of the Plenum Studies in Work and Industry book series (SSWI)

Abstract

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the communist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union were transformed into alternative political systems, ending single-party monopoly and incorporating party competition. Accompanying these political changes was the end of party-state domination of economies, with increased roles for markets and private property. Just as the move toward competitive party systems varied across the region, so too did the move to market-based economies. The dramatic changes in political and economic systems led to changes in the organization of labor-markets, though not all these changes have been uniform across the region. In most of the transition countries, the labor force and employment contracted. Unemployment, which had previously been hidden and not officially acknowledged, emerged. Changes in wage determination accompanied structural adjustments in economies.

Keywords

Labor Force Labor Force Participation Real Wage Unemployment Benefit Labor Force Participation Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adam, Jan, ed. 1987. “Similarities and Differences in the Treatment of Labour Shortages.” Pp. 127–148 in Employment Policies in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 2nd rev. ed., edited by Jan Adam. New York: St. Martin’s Press.Google Scholar
  2. Allison, Christine and Dena Ringold. 1996. Labor Markets in Transition in Central and Eastern Europe. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  3. Bilsen, Valentijn and Jozef Konings. 1998. “Job Creation, Job Destruction, and Growth of Newly Established, Privatized, and State-Owned Enterprises in Transition Economies: Survey Evidence from Bulgaria, Hungary, and Romania.” Journal of Comparative Economics 26:429–445.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Boeri, Tito. 1997. “Labour-Market Reforms in Transition Economies.” Oxford Review of Economic Policy 13(2):126–140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Boeri, Tito, Michal C. Burda, and János Köll. 1998. Mediating the Transition: Labour Markets in Central and Eastern Europe. New York: Institute for East-West Studies.Google Scholar
  6. Boeri, Tito and Mark Keese. 1992. “Labour Markets and the Transition in Central and Eastern Europe.” OECD Economic Studies 18:133–161.Google Scholar
  7. Commander, Simon and John McHale. 1996. “Unemployment and the Labor Market in Transition: A Review of the Experience in East Europe and Russia.” Pp. 277–314 in Economic Transition in Russian and the New States of Eurasia, edited by Bartlomiej Kaminski. Armonk, NY/London: M. E. Sharpe.Google Scholar
  8. Commander, Simon and Andrei Tolstopiatenko. 1997. “Unemployment, Restructuring and the Pace of Transition.” Pp. 331–350 in Lessons from the Economic Transition: Central and Eastern Europe in the 1990s, edited by Salvatore Zecchini. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Fallenbuchl, Zbigniew M. 1987. “Employment Policies in Poland.” Pp. 27–54 in Employment Policies in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 2nd rev. ed., edited by Jan Adam. New York: St. Martin’s Press.Google Scholar
  10. Gerber, Theodore P. and Michael Hout. 1998. “More Shock than Therapy: Market Transition, Employment, and Income in Russia, 1991–1995.” American fournal of Sociology 104:1–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Góra, Marek. 1997. “Central and East European Labour Markets in Transition.” Pp. 393–412 in Lessons from the Economic Transition: Central and Eastern Europe in the 1990s, edited by Salvatore Zecchini. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Góra, Marek and Christoph M. Schmidt. 1998. “Long-term Unemployment, Unemployment Benefits and Social Assistance: The Polish Experience.” Empirical Economics 23:55–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. International Labour Office. 1997–1998. World Labour Report, Volume 9. Geneva: International Labour Office.Google Scholar
  14. Jackman, Richard and Catalin Pauna. 1997. “Labour Market Policy and the Reallocation of Labour across Sectors.” Pp. 373–392 in Lessons from the Economic Transition: Central and Eastern Europe in the 1990s, edited by Salvatore Zecchini. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Jackman, Richard and Michal Rutkowski. 1994. “Labor Markets: Wages and Employment.” Pp. 121–159 in Labor Markets and Social Policy in Central and Eastern Europe, edited by Nicholas Barr. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Jones, Derek C. and Mariana M. Kotzeva. 1998. “Work Incentives and Other Effects of the Transition to Social Assistance in the Transition Economies: Evidence from Bulgaria.” Empirical Economics 23: 237–261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Kornai, János. 1992. The Socialist System: The Political Economy of Communism. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Kosta, Jiri. 1987. “Manpower Problems in the GDR.” Pp. 55–77 in Employment Policies in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 2nd rev. ed, edited by Jan Adam. New York: St. Martin’s Press.Google Scholar
  19. Micklewright, John and Gyula Nagy. 1998. “Unemployment Assistance in Hungary.” Empirical Economics 23:155–175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Ogloblin, Constantin G. 1999. “The Gender Earnings Differential in the Russian Transition Economy” Industrial and Labor Relations Review 52:602–627.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). 1999. OECD Employment Outlook. Paris: Author.Google Scholar
  22. Redor, Dominique. 1992. Wage Inequality in East and West. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Rutkowski, Jan J. 1996a. Changes in the Wage Structure during Economic Transition in Central and Eastern Europe. Washington, DC: World Bank.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Rutkowski, Jan J. 1996b. “High Skills Pay Off: The Changing Wage Structure During Economic Transition.” Economics of Transition 4:89–111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Schroeder, Gertrude E. 1987. “Managing Labour in the Soviet Union.” Pp. 3–26 in Employment Policies in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 2nd rev. ed., edited by Jan Adam. New York: St. Martin’s Press.Google Scholar
  26. Standing, Guy and Georg Fischer. 1993. “Policy Issues of the Emerging Labour Markets of Central and Eastern Europe.” Pp. 7–30 in Structural Change in Central and Eastern Europe: Labour Market and Social Policy Implications, edited by Georg Fischer and Guy Standing. Paris: Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.Google Scholar
  27. Vaughan-Whitehead, Daniel. 1998. “Wage Policy Reforms in Central and Eastern Europe: A First Assessment.” Pp. 13–80 in Paying the Price: The Wage Crisis in Central and Eastern Europe, edited by Daniel Vaughan-Whitehead. New York: St. Martin’s Press.Google Scholar
  28. World Bank. 1996. World Development Report 1996: From Plan to Market. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Jenkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European StudiesUniversity of Noth CarolinaChapel HillUSA

Personalised recommendations