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Development of Behavior Systems

  • Jerry A. Hogan
Part of the Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology book series (HBNE, volume 13)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to present a general framework for studying the development of behavior. The thesis to be defended here is that the building blocks of behavior are various kinds of perceptual, central, and motor components, all of which can exist independently. The study of development is primarily the study of changes in these components themselves and in the connections among them

Keywords

Behavior System Central Mechanism Zebra Finch Motor Pattern Perceptual Mechanism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerry A. Hogan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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