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Emerging Psychobiology of the Avian Song System

  • Timothy J. DeVoogd
  • Christine Lauay
Part of the Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology book series (HBNE, volume 13)

Abstract

This chapter builds on the excellent review of avian song development by [Bottjer and Arnold (1986)] that appeared in an earlier volume of this series ([Blass, 1986]). We first summarize the knowledge and perspectives on the neurobiology of song development and production of that time. We then present an overview of the major advances that have occurred since the earlier review, and finish with a description of the research avenues that we feel are likely to yield significant advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of bird song

Keywords

Zebra Finch Comparative Neurology Vocal Learning Song Learning Song Repertoire 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy J. DeVoogd
    • 1
  • Christine Lauay
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCornell UniversityIthaca

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