Northwest Microblade

  • Donald Clark

Abstract

absolute time period: 7000–2000 b.p.; earlier in the Yukon than east of the Rocky mountains

Keywords

Zinc Migration Mercury Tungsten Hull 

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Suggested Readings

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References

  1. Clark, Donald W., and Ruth M. Gotthardt (1998). “The Kelly Creek Site (KbTx-2) and Its Place among Microblade Industries of Northwestern Canada and Alaska.” Occasional Papers in Archaeology No. 6. Whitehorse; Yukon Heritage Branch.Google Scholar
  2. Hare, Paul Gregory (1995). Holocene Occupations in the Southern Yukon, New Perspectives from the Annie Lake Site Occasional Papers in Archaeology, No. 5. Heritage Branch, Whitehorse: Government of the Yukon Heritage Branch.Google Scholar
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  4. Workman, William B. (1978).Prehistory of the Aish-Kluane Area, Southwest Yukon Territory. National Museum of Man Mercury Series, Archaeological Survey of Canada Paper, No. 74. Ottawa: National Museum of Man.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald Clark
    • 1
  1. 1.NepeanCanada

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