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Mainland Southeast Asia Late Prehistoric

  • Miriam T. Stark
Chapter

Abstract

relative time period: Follows the Southeast Asia Early Prehistoric. This period is considered the interface between the late prehistoric and early historic periods and is sometimes called the Protohistoric period. Complex polities emerged during this time along the coasts and in the river valleys of mainland Southeast Asia, and it is also likely that many subsistence strategies like hunting and gathering continued into this period. At its early end (i.e., 2500–1500 b.p.), some archaeologists have also called this period the “Iron Age,” “General Period C,” and the “High Metal Age.” The period after a.d. 200 falls into Higham’s “General Period D” and the beginning of regionally specific chronologies. In central Burma, we see the initiation of the Pyu period, and in Central Thailand, we see the origins of the Dvaravati period. In the Khorat plateau/Tonle Sap region, the founding of the Khmer empire signals the end of this period in a.d. 802. In northern and central Vietnam, this is a transitional phase between Bronze Age complex societies and the earliest states. To ease discussion, the period from 2500–1500 b.p. will be glossed as the “early historic period.”

Keywords

Archaeological Research Mekong Delta Historical Geography Craft Specialization Asian Perspective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miriam T. Stark
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA

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