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Hoabinhian

  • Rasmi Shoocongdej
Chapter

Abstract

relative time period: Follows the Southeast Asia Upper Paleolithic tradition and precedes the Southeast Asia Neolithic and Bronze Age tradition.

Keywords

Late Pleistocene Stone Tool Faunal Remains Bamboo Charcoal Rock Shelter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

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References

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References

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References

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References

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rasmi Shoocongdej
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ArchaeologySilpakom UniversityBangkokThailand

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