Cognitive Assessment System (CAS)

  • Jack A. Naglieri
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the use and interpretation of the Cognitive Assessment System. In writing this chapter I will encourage practitioners to take a technological step from traditional IQ tests to a modern approach to ability and its measurement. I view the CAS as a new technology that reflects advances made in psychology during the past 50 years and a tool that propels the field into the twenty-first century. The CAS is based on a strong theory and at the same time incorporates what has been learned in applied psychology and especially psychometrics. Most importantly, research presented in this chapter will show that the CAS is highly related to achievement, yields PASS profiles that are diagnostically important, and is relevant to intervention.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack A. Naglieri
    • 1
  1. 1.George Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

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