Algorithmic Information

  • Jan Kåhre
Chapter
Part of the The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 684)

Abstract

Intuitively, information and complexity go together. We feel that a complex message must contain more information then a simple one. Complexity is, however, an illusive property. A Mandelbrot fractal pattern may look intricate, indeed, but to a mathematician it is simple. No more information than a small piece of computer program is needed to reproduce the pattern.

Keywords

Entropy Europe Assure Barium Hunt 

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Reference

  1. [3]
    In this form not a paradox, “all that follows is that Epimenides is a liar and that at least one Cretan is truthful” Smullyan, 1990, p.226. The real paradox is that an islander lies. I can assure that all islanders (mostly fishermen and sailors) are always truthful, because I am myself from the Åland Islands.Google Scholar
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    G.J. Chaitin: “A theory of program size formally identical to information theory”, J.ACM 22 (1975), pp. 329..340.MathSciNetMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Our private psychological probabilities may induce us to predict the unpredictable, as manifested in “the Monte Carlo fallacy, which makes us expect a failure after a run of successes, and vice versa” Cohen, 1954, p.34.Google Scholar
  4. [12]
    A. Pickering: Constructing Quarks/Edinburgh Univ. Press, 1984. Related in Gribbin, 1996, p. 198.Google Scholar
  5. [13]
    Based on the hypothesis that every culture by necessity goes through a cycle of spring-summer-fall-winter Spengler, 1923, p.68.Google Scholar
  6. [18]
    Identical as a problem to Bertrand’s box paradox Blackburn, 1996, p.44.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

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  • Jan Kåhre

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