Effects of Dietary Vitamin D and UVB Irradiance on Voluntary Exposure to Ultraviolet Light, Growth and Survival of the Panther Chameleon

Furcifer pardalis
  • Gary W. Ferguson
  • William H. Gehrmann
  • Stephen H. Hammack
  • Tai C. Chen
  • Michael F. Holick

Abstract

Vertebrates require vitamin D for several bodily processes including the regulation of calcium and phosphorus levels1. Vitamin D is obtained in two ways. First, vitamin D can be obtained from the diet2. Second, vitamin D can be produced in the skin upon exposure to ultraviolet B irradiation (UVB, 280–315nm)2.

Keywords

Phosphorus Cage Photolysis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary W. Ferguson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • William H. Gehrmann
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Stephen H. Hammack
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Tai C. Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Michael F. Holick
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Texas Christian UniversityFort Worth
  2. 2.Fort Worth ZooFort Worth
  3. 3.Boston Medical CenterBoston

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