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Effects of Dietary Vitamin D and UVB Irradiance on Voluntary Exposure to Ultraviolet Light, Growth and Survival of the Panther Chameleon

Furcifer pardalis
  • Gary W. Ferguson
  • William H. Gehrmann
  • Stephen H. Hammack
  • Tai C. Chen
  • Michael F. Holick

Abstract

Vertebrates require vitamin D for several bodily processes including the regulation of calcium and phosphorus levels1. Vitamin D is obtained in two ways. First, vitamin D can be obtained from the diet2. Second, vitamin D can be produced in the skin upon exposure to ultraviolet B irradiation (UVB, 280–315nm)2.

Keywords

Dietary Vitamin Null Probability Previous Laboratory Experiment High Dietary Vitamin Indoor Husbandry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary W. Ferguson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • William H. Gehrmann
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Stephen H. Hammack
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Tai C. Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Michael F. Holick
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Texas Christian UniversityFort Worth
  2. 2.Fort Worth ZooFort Worth
  3. 3.Boston Medical CenterBoston

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