Sources of Agricultural Productivity Growth at the State Level, 1960–1993

  • Jet Yee
  • Wallace E. Huffman
  • Mary Ahearn
  • Doris Newton
Part of the Studies in Productivity and Efficiency book series (SIPE, volume 2)

Abstract

This paper examines the contributions of public agricultural research, extension, and highway infrastructure to agricultural productivity of regions composed of groups of states for the period 1960 to 1993. It estimates separate contributions of a state’s own public agricultural research, spillovers of agricultural research from other states, and the interaction effects between a state’s own public agricultural research and agricultural extension.

Keywords

Corn Covariance Transportation Marketing Explosive 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jet Yee
  • Wallace E. Huffman
  • Mary Ahearn
  • Doris Newton

There are no affiliations available

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