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Contemporary Aboriginal Perceptions of Community

  • Pat Dudgeon
  • John Mallard
  • Darlene Oxenham
  • John Fielder
Part of the The Plenum Series in Social/Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Aboriginal Australian people have lived on the continent for over 40,000 years. They were a hunting-gathering people, with a total population, prior to colonization, estimated to be at least 300,000 people, and possibly as high as 1,000,000 ( Bourke, 1994). From the onset of colonization in 1788, as was the case for many other Indigenous peoples, the subsequent centuries were characterized by genocide; by forced removal from land, peoples, families; by enslavement; and by assimilation and destruction of cultural ways. Despite this, the fact that Indigenous people have sustained their identity, and are experiencing a cultural renaissance, is a testimony to the determination of the human spirit.

Keywords

Indigenous People Aboriginal Community Community Development Cultural Group Aboriginal People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pat Dudgeon
    • 1
  • John Mallard
    • 1
  • Darlene Oxenham
    • 1
  • John Fielder
    • 1
  1. 1.Curtin UniversityAustralia

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