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Androgen Influence on Gene Expression in the Meibomian Gland

  • H. Yamagami
  • F. Schirra
  • M. Liu
  • S. M. Richards
  • B. D. Sullivan
  • D. A. Sullivan
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 506)

Abstract

Our previous research has demonstrated that the meibomian gland is an androgen target organ.1 This tissue contains androgen receptor mRNA, androgen receptor protein within acinar epithelial cell nuclei and the mRNAs for both Types 1 and 2 5±-reductase, an enzyme that converts testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone into the potent androgen, 5a-dihydrotestosterone.2,3 Our studies also indicate that androgens, as well as gender, may influence gene expression in the rabbit and/or mouse meibomian glands.4,5 The purpose of this study was to identify androgen-regulated genes that may depend upon the presence of functional androgen receptors, and that may mediate the gender-related differences in gene expression in the meibomian gland.

Keywords

Foreign Body Sensation Contact Lens Wear Separate Logistic Regression Analysis Doctor Diagnosis CIBA Vision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Yamagami
    • 1
  • F. Schirra
    • 1
  • M. Liu
    • 1
  • S. M. Richards
    • 1
  • B. D. Sullivan
    • 1
  • D. A. Sullivan
    • 1
  1. 1.Schepens Eye Research Institute and the Department of OphthalmologyHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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