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Potential Role of Disrupted Lacrimal Acinar Cells in Dry Eye during Pregnancy

  • Joel E. Schechter
  • Michael Pidgeon
  • Donald Chang
  • Yi-Ching Fong
  • Melvin D. Trousdale
  • Natalie Chang
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 506)

Abstract

Recently, dry eye disease has been linked with hormonal changes in several patient populations. For instance, there is a high incidence of dry eye disease that accompanies aging in postmenopausal women (Molina et al., 1986), and there appears to be an increased incidence of disease during pregnancy (unpublished data). Furthermore, increased addition infiltration of lymphocytes into the lacrimal glands has also been associated with aging (Murray et al., 1981; Damato et al., 1984). Serum levels of androgens have been shown to be important in maintenance of normal lacrimal gland function (Mircheff et al., 1996).

Keywords

Goblet Cell Ocular Surface Lacrimal Gland Open Arrow Secretory Component 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joel E. Schechter
    • 1
  • Michael Pidgeon
    • 1
  • Donald Chang
    • 1
  • Yi-Ching Fong
    • 2
  • Melvin D. Trousdale
    • 1
    • 2
  • Natalie Chang
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Doheny Eye InstituteLos AngelesUSA

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