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Application of Atelocollagen Solution for Lacrimal Duct Occlusion

  • Jun Onodera
  • Akihiko Saito
  • Joseph GeorgeTom Iwasaki
  • Hiroshi Ito
  • Yu Aso
  • Takashi Hamano
  • Atushi Kanai
  • Teruo Miyata
  • Yutaka Nagai
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 506)

Abstract

Dry eye is a condition of dry, irritated, burning or gritty feeling in the eyes. It is mainly caused by ocular surface diseases, immunomodulation or injuries that affect tear secretion or composition.The diagnosis and treatment of dry eyes have improved dramatically during recent years. Application of artificial tears is usually carried out as a method of treatment, but it requires frequent application and provides only temporary effect. In addition, it leads to epithelial cell toxicity, changes in epithelial membrane permeability and increased chances of eye infections. Punctal occlusion prevents the discharge of natural tears from the lacrimal punctum. Punctal occlusion prolongs the duration of tears on the ocular surface of the eye and improves the symptoms of dye eye significantly. The conventional method of punctal occlusion is the application of solid-type punctal plugs such as collagen-rod, silicone or plastic plugs. Such plugs often cause an unpleasant foreign-body sensation, corneal epithelial cell damage, granulation and accidental dropout.To overcome such problems, we developed 3% atelocollagen solution, which

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jun Onodera
    • 1
  • Akihiko Saito
    • 2
  • Joseph GeorgeTom Iwasaki
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Ito
    • 1
  • Yu Aso
    • 1
  • Takashi Hamano
    • 3
  • Atushi Kanai
    • 4
  • Teruo Miyata
    • 1
  • Yutaka Nagai
    • 1
  1. 1.Koken Bioscience InstituteTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Triangle Animal HospitalTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of OphthalmologyOsaka University Medical SchoolOsakaJapan
  4. 4.Department of OphthalmologyJuntendo University Medical SchoolTokyoJapan

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