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The Role of Dopamine Receptors in Regulating the Size of Axonal Arbours

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Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI,volume 52)

Abstract

Neurones in the adult central nervous system can form new synapse and branches1-3. These changes can also be seen following injury to the striatum or the Substantia Nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and include the formation of new synaptic terminals, growth-cones, neunte formation, increased number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH-ir) hypertrophic fibres penetrating the striatum and the upregulated expression of factors that support neunte outgrowth and cell survival4-12.

Keywords

  • Tyrosine Hydroxylase
  • Dopamine Receptor
  • Adult Central Nervous System
  • Dopaminergic Terminal
  • Partial Lesion

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to M. K. Horne .

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Finkelstein, D.I., Parish, C.L., Stanic, D., Borrelli, E., Drago, J., Horne, M.K. (2002). The Role of Dopamine Receptors in Regulating the Size of Axonal Arbours. In: Nicholson, L.F.B., Faull, R.L.M. (eds) The Basal Ganglia VII. Advances in Behavioral Biology, vol 52. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-0715-4_31

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-0715-4_31

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