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Establishing and Maintaining Evidence-Based Treatment in Community Programs

  • Robert J. Meyers
  • Natasha Slesnick

Abstract

Over the past 40 years, an abundance of research has focused on which alcohol treatment approaches are most effective. Adult alcoholism treatment research clearly indicates that even brief treatment is generally better than no treatment at all, that certain treatments are more consistently effective than other methods, and also that there is no single treatment that is superior to all others. However, a handful of treatments seem to rise to the top in all meta-analytic reviews of the alcohol treatment literature. Even though most of these well-supported treatments have been available for some time, the gap between science and practice remains vast.

Keywords

Substance Abuse Treatment Alcohol Treatment Social Skill Training Client Outcome Motivational Enhancement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Meyers
    • 1
  • Natasha Slesnick
    • 1
  1. 1.Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and AddictionsUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA

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