Abstract

It would be difficult to find a subpopulation with higher rates of substance use disorders than offenders. In the United States in1999, there were a total of 43.8 million contacts between police and U.S. citizens in their jurisdiction including traffic stops and other matters (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2001) resulting in about 15 million arrests (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2000a). In cities participating in an Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2000b), an average of 65.8% of male arrestees and 64.2% of female arrestees tested positive for an illicit drug at arrest. Still more offenders are problematically involved with drugs and alcohol but do not test positive at the time of arrest (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2000a). In sum, the vast majority of those incarcerated, at least in the United States, show a diagnosable substance use disorder.

Keywords

Criminal Justice Criminal Justice System Substance Abuse Treatment Justice Statistics Drug Court 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alcoholics Anonymous (1952). Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions. New York: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services.Google Scholar
  2. Alcoholics Anonymous (1976). Alcoholics Anonymous (3rd ed.). New York: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services.Google Scholar
  3. Alemagno, S.A. (2001). Women in jail: Is substance abuse treatment enough? American Journal of Public Health, 91, 798–800.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Anglin, M.D. (1988). The efficacy of civil commitment in treating narcotic addiction. In C. Lukefeld and F. Tims (Eds.) Compulsory Treatment of Drug Abuse: Research and Clinical Practice. NIDA Research Monograph 86. Washington, D.C.: US Department of health and Human Services.Google Scholar
  5. Beck, A.J., and Karberg, J.C. (2001). Prison and jail inmates at midyear 2000. Rureau of Justice Statistics Rulletin. Washington, D.C.: US Department of Justice.Google Scholar
  6. Belenko, S. (1998). Research on drug courts: A critical review. National Drug Court Institute Review, 1, 1–42.Google Scholar
  7. Bureau of Justice Statistics (2000a). Sourcebook of Criminal Justice Statistics 1999. Washington, D.C.: US Department of Justice.Google Scholar
  8. Bureau of Justice Statistics (2000b). 1999 Annual Report on Drug Use Among Adult and Juvenile Arrestees. Washington, D.C.: US Department of Justice.Google Scholar
  9. Bureau of Justice Statistics (2001). Contacts between Police and the Public: Findings from the 1999 National Survey. Washington D.C.: US Department of Justice.Google Scholar
  10. Carroll, K.M. (1998). Treating drug dependence: Recent advances and old truths. In W.R. Miller & N. Heather (Eds.). Treating addictive behaviors (2nd ed.). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  11. Clear, T.R., and Rose, D.R. (1999) When neighbors go to jail: Impact on attitudes about formal and informal social control. National Institute of Justice Research Preview. Washington, D.C.: US Department of Justice.Google Scholar
  12. Gendreau, P. (1996). Offender rehabilitation: What we know and what needs to be done. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 24, 144–161.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Gendreau, P., Goggin, C., and Law, M.A. (1996). Principles of effective assessment for community corrections. Federal Probation, 60, 64–70.Google Scholar
  14. Gendreau, P., Little, T., and Goggin, C. (1996). A meta-analysis of the predictors of adult offender recidivism: What works! Criminology, 34, 575–607.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Glasser, W. (1976). Positive Addictions. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  16. Griffith, J.D., Hiller, ML., Knight, K., and Simpson, D.D. (1999). A cost-efectiveness analysis of in-prison therapeutic community treatment and risk classification. The Prison Journal: An International Forum on Incarceration and Alternative Sanctions, 79, 352–368.Google Scholar
  17. Hester, R.K., and Miller, W.R. (in press). Handbook of alcoholism treatment approaches: Effective alternatives (3rd ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
  18. Hiller, M.L., Knight, K., and Simpson, D.D. (1999). Risk factors that predict dropout from corrections-based treatment for drug abuse. The Prison Journal: An International Forum on Incarceration and Alternative Sanctions, 79, 411–430.Google Scholar
  19. Hoffman, M.B. (2000). The drug court scandal. North Carolina Law Review. 78N.C.L. Rev. 1437.Google Scholar
  20. Kadden, R., Carroll, K., Donovan, D., Cooney, N., Monti, P., Abrams, D., Litt, M., and Hester, R. (1992). Cognitive-Rehavioral Coping Skills Therapy Manual: A Clinical Research Guide for Therapists Treating Individuals With Alcohol Abuse and Dependence. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Project MATCH Monograph Series, Vol. 1. Washington, D.C.: US Department of Health and Human Services.Google Scholar
  21. Kadden, R.M., Cooney, N.L., Getter, H., and Litt, M.D. (1989). Matching alcoholics to coping skills or interactional therapies: Posttreatment results. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 57, 698–704.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Knight, K., Simpson, D.D., and Hiller, M.L. (1999). Three-year reincarceration outcomes for in-prison therapeutic community treatment in Texas. The Prison Journal: An International Forum on Incarceration and Alternative Sanctions, 79, 337–351.Google Scholar
  23. Laundergan, J.C. (1982). Easy Does It: Alcoholism Treatment Outcomes, Hazelden and The Minnesota Model. Center City, MN: Hazelden.Google Scholar
  24. Lipton, D.S. (1998). Treatment for drug abusing offenders during correctional supervision: A nationwide overview. Journal of Offender Rehabilitation, 26, 1–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Lipton, D.S., Martinson, R., and Wilks, J. (1975). The Effectiveness of Correctional Treatment: A Survey of Treatment Evaluation Studies. New York: Praeger.Google Scholar
  26. Love, C, Shepard, D.S., Daley, M., White, K., and Petersen, C. (2000, November). The cost effectiveness of substance abuse treatment for inmates in Connecticut prisons. Paper presented at the American Public Health Association meeting, Boston, MA.Google Scholar
  27. Lukefeld, C.G., and Tims, F.M. (1988). Compulsory Treatment: A review of findings. In C. Lukefeld and F. Tims (eds.). Compulsory Treatment of Drug Abuse: Research and Clinical Practice.NIDA Research Monograph 86. Washington, D.C.: US Department of Health and Human Services.Google Scholar
  28. Marlatt, G.A., and Gordon, J.R. (1985). Relapse prevention. In G.A. Marlatt and J.R. Gordon (eds.).Relapse Prevention. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  29. Martin, S.S., Butzin, C.A., Saum, C.A., and Inciardi, J.A. (1999). Three-year outcomes of therapeutic community treatment for drug-involved offenders in Deleware. The Prison Journal: An International Forum on Incarceration and Alternative Sanctions, 79, 294–320.Google Scholar
  30. Monti, P.M., Abrams, D.B., Kadden, R.M., and Cooney, N.L. (1989). Treating alcohol dependence.New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  31. Nowinski, J., Baker, S., and Carroll, K. (1992). Twelve Step Facilitation Therapy Manual: A Clinical Research Guide for Therapists Treating Individuals With Alcohol Abuse and Dependence.National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Project MATCH Monograph Series,Vol. 1. Washington, D.C.: US Department of Health and Human Services.Google Scholar
  32. Martin, S.S., Clifford, B.A., Saum, C.A., and Inciardi, J.A. (1999). Three-year outcomes of therapeutic community treatment for drug-involved offenders in Delaware: From prison to work release to aftercare. The Prison Journal: An International Forum on Incarceration and Alternative Sanctions, 79, 294–320.Google Scholar
  33. Pearson, F.S., and Lipton, D.S. (1999). A meta-analytic review of the effectiveness of corrections-based treatments for drug abuse. The Prison Journal: An International Forum on Incarceration and Alternative Sanctions, 79, 384–410.Google Scholar
  34. Tonry, M. (1999, September). Reconsidering indeterminate and structured sentencing. Sentencing & Corrections: Issues for the 21st Century. Papers from the executive sessions on sentencing and corrections No.2. Washington, D.C.: US Department of Justice.Google Scholar
  35. Tullis, L. (1995). Unintended Consequences: Illegal Drugs & Drug Policies in Nine Countries.London: Lynne Reinner Publishers.Google Scholar
  36. Wexler, H.K., and Love, C.T. (1995). Therapeutic communities in prisons. In F. Tims, G. DeLeon,and N. Janechill (eds.). The Therapeutic Community as a Treatment. National Institute of Drug Abuse Research Monographs, 144. Washington, D.C. Supt. of Documents: US Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  37. Wexler, H.K., Melnick, G., Lowe, L., and Peters, J. (1999). Three-year reincarceration outcomes for Amity in-prison therapeutic community and aftercare in California. The Prison Journal:An International Forum on Incarceration and Alternative Sanctions, 79, 321–336.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Craig T. Love
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Alcohol and Addiction StudiesBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA

Personalised recommendations