Wundt and the Americans

From Flirtation to Abandonment
  • Robert W. Rieber
Part of the Path in Psychology book series (PATH)

Abstract

In 1920, no less than G. Stanley Hall had the following to say about Wilhelm Wundt:

Wundt has had for decades the prestige of a most advantageous academic chair. He founded the first laboratory for experimental psychology, which attracted many of the most gifted and mature students from all lands. By his development of the doctrine of apperception he took psychology forever beyond the old associationism which had ceased to be fruitful. He also established the independence of psychology from physiology, and by his encyclopaedic and always thronged lectures, to say nothing of his more or less esoteric seminary, he materially advanced every branch of natural sciences and extended its influence over the whole wide domain of folklore, mores, language, and primitive religion. His best texts will long constitute a thesaurus which every psychologist must know. (p. 6)

Keywords

Fatigue Assimilation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert W. Rieber

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