Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Methodology for Boron Localisation in Plant Cell Walls

  • Isabelle His
  • Iain M. R. Mackinnon
  • Mazz Marry
  • I. Max Huxham
  • Michael C. Jarvis

Abstract

Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) depends on the phenomenon that when an electron beam interacts with electrons in matter, as in a conventional transmission electron microscope, each beam electron can lose a characteristic amount of its energy. The magnitude of the energy loss depends on which element has been struck by the beam electron, and on which transition occurs between inner-shell atomic orbitals of that element. For a specific element there are one, or sometimes more, characteristic features or ‘edges’ in the EELS spectrum. When there are two distinct EELS edges (e.g. the K and L edges) for an element, these are derived from different orbital transitions. Valence (outer) electrons are not involved in these transitions but the fine structure of the L edges, in particular, contains information derived from minor interactions with the valence electron configuration and hence on the bonding environment of the atom.

Keywords

Cellulose Phosphorus Boron 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isabelle His
    • 1
  • Iain M. R. Mackinnon
    • 1
  • Mazz Marry
    • 1
  • I. Max Huxham
    • 1
  • Michael C. Jarvis
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental, Agricultural and Analytical Chemistry, Chemistry DepartmentGlasgow UniversityGlasgowScotland

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