Advertisement

Gene Transfer to the Salivary Glands: Applications in Gene Therapy

  • Ela Shai
  • Amos Panet
  • Haya Falk
  • Aaron Palmon

Abstract

Transfer of genetic material to salivary glands offers a wide range of potential clinical applications, such as correction of salivary function (Mastrangeli et al.,1994), therapy of salivary carcinomas (Samuelson, 1996) and secretion of therapeutic proteins such as growth factors, enzymes and antigens (Barka, 1996). The salivary glands hold several advantages for gene transfer: salivary cells are designed to synthesize and secrete abundant quantities of proteins both to the saliva and the blood circulation. In addition, salivary glands are readily accessible without surgery by cannulation via their excretory duct, which open in the mouth. In humans, salivary glands are routinely cannulized for contrast imagining (Baum, 1999). Salivary glands are comprised of acinar cells and ductal cells (Figure 1). The acinar cells synthesize most of the exocrine proteins in the saliva and the ductal cells carry the saliva to the oral cavity and control its electrolyte composition. In addition to their essential roles in proper maintenance of the upper digestive system by exocrine secretion, salivary secreted endocrine proteins have been reported to affect distal tissues. Salivary proteins such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), nerve growth factor (NGF) (Arancibia, 1985), renin and kalikreins (Penschow, 1993) were traced in the blood circulation. NGF was also traced in the nerve system (Arancibia, 1985).

Keywords

Salivary Gland Nerve Growth Factor Acinar Cell Submandibular Gland Adenoviral Vector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adesanya, M.R., Redman, R.S., Baum, B.J. and O’Connell, B.C. 1996 Immediate inflammatory responses to adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in rat salivary glands. Hum. GeneTher. 7, 1085–1093.Google Scholar
  2. Arancibia, S., and Assenmacher, I. 1985 Submaxillary glands in an endocrine context. J. Biol. Buccale. 13(3), 185–203.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Barka, T., and Van Der Noen, H.M. 1996 Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into salivary glands in vivo. Hum. Gene Ther. 7, 613–618.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Baum, B.J and O’Connell, B.C. 1999 In vivo gene transfer to salivary glands. Crit. Rev. Oral Biol. Med. 10(3), 276–283.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. He, X., Goldsmith, C.M., Marmary, Y., Wellner, R.B., Parlow, A.F., Neiman, L.K., and Baum, B.J. 1998 Systemic action of human growth hormone following adenovirusmediated gene transfer to rat submandibular glands. Gene Ther. 5(4), 537–541.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Kagami, H., O’Connell B.C., and Baum, J.B. 1996 Evidence for the systemic delivery of a transgene product from salivary glands. Hum. Gene Ther. 7, 2177–2184.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Larkin, D.F.P., Oral, H.B., Ring, C.J.A., Lemoine, N.R., and George, A.J.T 1996, Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to the corneal endothelium. Transplantation. 61, 363–370.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Mastrangeli, A., O’Connell, B., Aladib, W., Fox, P.C., Baum, B.J., and Crystal, R.G. 1994 Direct in vivo adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to salivary glands. Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 266, G1146–G1155.Google Scholar
  9. Moss, B. 1996 Genetically engineered poxviruses for recombinant gene expression, vaccination, and safety. PNAS 93(21), 11341–11348.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. O’Connell, B.C., Xu, T., Walsh, T.J., Sein, T., Mastrangeli, A., Crystal, R.G., Oppenheim, F.G., and Baum, B.J. 1996 Transfer of a gene encoding the anticandidal protein histatin 3 to salivary glands. Hum. Gene Ther. 7, 2255–2261.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Penschow, J.D., and Coghlan, J.P. 1993 Secretion of glandular kallikrein and renin from the basolateral pole of mouse submandibular duct cells: an immunocytochemical study. J. Histochem. Cytochem 41(1), 95–103.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Robertson D. and Fritz J. 1996. Introduction and overview to gene therapy. www.mc.vanderbit.edu/gcrc/gene/viral.htm.
  13. Samuelson, L.C. 1996 Transgenic approaches to salivary gland res. Ann. Rev. Physiol. 58, 209–220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Sgonc, R., Boeck, G., Dietrich, H., Gruber, J., Recheis, H., Wick, G. 1994 Simultaneous determination of cell surface antigens and apoptosis. Trends Genet.; 10(2): 41–42.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Wang, C., Chao, C., Chao, L., Chao, J. 1997 Expression of human tissue kallikrein in rat salivary glands and its secretion into circulation following adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. Immunopharmacology. 36(2-3), 221–227.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ela Shai
    • 1
  • Amos Panet
    • 2
  • Haya Falk
    • 2
  • Aaron Palmon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dental MedicineHebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Virology, Faculty of MedicineHebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael

Personalised recommendations