Social Support Processes in Early Childhood Friendship: A Comparative Study of Ecological Congruences in Enacted Support

  • Thomas A. Rizzo
  • William A. Corsaro
Chapter

Abstract

Two significant advancements have occurred in social support research in the past decade. First, prompted by Barrera (1986), Heller and Swindle (1983), Sarason, Shearin, Pierce, and Sarason (1987), and others, researchers are making clearer distinctions between three facets of social support: social embeddedness (i.e., the extensivity and density of the social network), perceived support (i.e., appraisals of the availability and adequacy of supportive ties), and enacted (or received) support (i.e., the interpersonal transactions in which aid is dispensed). The second advance, spurred by Brown (1979), Coyne and DeLongis (1986), B. Gottlieb (1985,1988), Hobfoll and Stokes (1988), and Thoits (1982, 1986), among others, is that researchers have an increased interest in the processes of support; that is, the system or series of events leading to the provision of support. The upshot is that investigators are developing methodologies which allow them to study specific facets of support in a time-sensitive fashion in their everyday contexts (cf. Montgomery & Duck, 1991).

Keywords

Sugar Depression Bors Kelly Tolan 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas A. Rizzo
  • William A. Corsaro

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