Oneota

  • Guy Gibbon
Chapter

Abstract

Relative Time Period: Appears during the Late Woodland tradition, extends into the early historic period.

Keywords

Corn Transportation Flare Hunt Excavation 

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Suggested Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guy Gibbon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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