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Early Paleoindian

  • Kenneth B. Tankersley
Chapter

Abstract

Relative Time Period: The oldest unambiguous cultural tradition in the Americas, it precedes the Late Paleoindian and all subsequent traditions.

Keywords

Late Pleistocene Ground Moraine Base Camp Projectile Point Confluence Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth B. Tankersley
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ArchaeologyCleveland Museum of Natural HistoryClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Department of Art and ArchaeologyAugustana CollegeSioux FallsUSA

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