Aquatic Biodiversity in Arid and Semi-Arid Zones of Asia and Water Management

  • Brij Gopal

Abstract

Contrary to the general impression, and paradoxical as it may appear, arid and semiarid regions are often quite rich in water resources and have many aquatic habitats. Some of the world’s large rivers such as Nile, Indus and Murray—Darling, pass through the arid regions though their source of water lies far outside the arid zone (Williams 2000). Many large and deep lakes, mostly brackish or saline, also occur within the arid regions; for example Caspian Sea, Aral Sea, Dead Sea, Lake Chad, and the Great Salt Lake. There are hundreds of seasonal and ephemeral streams and thousands of shallow, freshwater and saline lakes (now better known as wetlands) of varying size and depth, many of which are permanent.

Keywords

Manifold Phytoplankton Sponge Malaria Macrophyte 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brij Gopal
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Environmental SciencesJawaharlal Nehru UniversityNew DelhiIndia

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